Congress needs the US presidents influence to make certain important decisions

Congress needs the US presidents influence to make certain important decisions. In order for new laws to be passed and for some bills to be vetoed, the US president must help and influence congress on these decisions. It is necessary for the US president to have influence over the congress, this influence helps congress in the way that either reassures their decision or shows them another point of view to take into consideration. The president is an important player in legislation because most of the time it is easier to get approval of the president to pass laws rather than supermajorities. Presidents are among the most important influences in the passage on new laws by congress. This leads to the question, what are some methods that the US presidents have used to influence or control congress? There are very many different methods the US president can influence congress; one way is the president can make their preferences known to the legislative branch to influence the outcome of the legislature. Also by threatening to veto legislation that they do not like. The president can also influence congress by the use of bully pulpit and the presidential veto. Checks and balances is also a huge way that the US president influences congress.
One huge way that the US president influences congress is by making their preferences known to the legislative branch to influence the outcome of legislature. The Framers of the Constitution gave the President the power to veto acts of Congress to prevent the legislative branch from becoming too powerful. This is an illustration of the separation of powers integral to the U.S. Constitution. By separating the powers of government into three branches and creating a system of “checks and balances” between them, the Framers hoped to prevent the
misuse or abuse of power. In Article I – The Legislative Branch; Section 7 – Revenue Bills, Legislative Process, and Presidential Veto states that every Bill that is passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate, will be presented to the President of the United States before it becomes a law. If the President approves, he would sign it. If not, the President would return it, with his Objections to that House in which it would have been originated, who would enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after Reconsideration two thirds of that House agree to pass the Bill, it would then be sent together with the Objections, to the other House by which it would be reconsidered, or if approved by two thirds, it would become a Law. But in all cases, the Votes of both Houses would be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for or against the Bill would be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill is not returned by the President within ten Days, excluding Sundays, it shall be presented to him.
Another way that the US president influences congress is by threatening to veto legislation that they do not like or agree with. The veto power does not give the President the power to amend or alter the content of legislation, the President only has the ability to accept or reject an entire act passed by Congress. The President, however, can influence and shape legislation by a threat of a veto. By threatening a veto, the President can persuade legislators to alter the content of the bill to be more acceptable to the President. Congress can override a veto by passing the act by a two-thirds vote in both the House and the Senate. The President’s veto power is significant because Congress rarely overrides vetoes—out of 1,484 regular vetoes since 1789, only 7.1%, or 106, have been overridden. This occurs fairly often, but the threat of a veto is much more prevalent than an actual veto. Usually if a president threatens a veto congress will take a second look at the bill and maybe revise it. Vetoes are very rarely overridden. The president has some advantages over congress when it comes to persuasion. Since they are the leader, they are the central figure in charge of the country. A president’s public perception is often directly related to their ability to persuade.