The office of president in Pakistan and the hereditary rule of Britain’s monarch at first glance seem to be very distinct from one another where the former is a part of a democratic political system who is indirectly elected by the electoral college of the Pakistan’s parliament for a required term of five years

The office of president in Pakistan and the hereditary rule of Britain’s monarch at first glance seem to be very distinct from one another where the former is a part of a democratic political system who is indirectly elected by the electoral college of the Pakistan’s parliament for a required term of five years. Whereas on the other hand the latter follows a tradition of hereditary rule whereby a natural order of succession is strictly obeyed after the demise or abdication of the British monarch and that too for a term no less than a lifetime. However, if one begins to dissect, compare and weigh their dominion or say in the political system around them, it becomes less vague that both these offices hold minimal powers to the extent that the mere idea of their presence has become a common discourse among people. In fact, on the contrary, their counterparts i.e. the prime ministers of both respective countries hold substantial powers such as that of legitimately running the government and so forth. But it was never a case like so. Over the course of time and the unfolding events of past, the power of the British monarch was reduced from sky high to the ground.